The Virtual Tour of Massaro Community Farm is now available on CT NOFA’s YouTube Channel.

Here’s the LINK

The 1 hour video includes visits to Assawaga Farm and Sub Edge Farm, also participating as No-Till Research Farm Sites across Connecticut.

There is also a Rain Simulator presentation by Emily Cole, Climate and Agriculture Program Manager at American Farmland Trust. To view Emily’s entire presentation here’s the LINK

This event was funded by an NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant exploring best practices for tillage reduction on organic farms, managed in partnership between CT NOFA, NOFA/Mass, and NOFA-NJ.”

 

 

We recently had the opportunity to catch up with Stephanie Berluti, one of two farmers in our 2020 Journey Person program at her farm, South Haven Farm, in Orange, CT.

Stephanie officially started South Haven Farm in early 2020 where she grows crops including kale, radishes, carrots, tomatoes, collards, swiss chard, and flowers on a ½ acre of land using organic methods. She will also be starting microgreens for the fall and winter. While she is not yet USDA certified, Stephanie knows this is the direction she wants to take and is using her knowledge of organic practices from her farming experience while she begins the process of organic certification.

Stephanie spent the last 6 years traveling around the country and learning to grow in different climates and soil types culminating with the CT NOFA Journey Person program and the beginning of South Haven Farm.

“Having the opportunity to be a part of CT NOFA’s journeyperson program has given me a leg up in my first year of running my own operation, both financially and mentally. I was able to use my stipend to expand my cultivation tool kit by purchasing a garden tiller and a high-quality wheel hoe. The stipend allowed me to higher quality tools at a greater cost that will last ions longer than the cheaper version that I would probably hate and replace within my first few years”.

She began her farming career as an apprentice at Serenbe Farms outside of Atlanta, GA, then spent a season farming by the beach on Martha’s Vineyard at North Tabor Farm. Stephanie then honed her market garden farming skills at Steadfast Farm in Phoenix, AZ as their assistant farm manager. Finally, in 2018, Stephanie returned to Connecticut where she is currently the NY/CT gardener for Green City Growers (based in Boston) where she manages the 30 Rock Chef’s Garden for the Rainbow Room in NYC. However, due to COVID all of those sites were placed on hold this year.

These diverse farming experiences were invaluable in starting her own farm operation. “I don’t know if I would have had the confidence to begin a project like this without the knowledge I gained from those farms”. It wasn’t only knowledge of growing practices that were valuable for Stephanie, but also business practices and consumer engagement. “I learned a lot from the different ways these farms marketed and sold their products. In Atlanta, since I worked on a farm located in an Agri-hood (planned community based around a farm) we focused more on direct to consumer sales and building personal relationships with families in the community through educational programs and events. At Steadfast Farm in Arizona, I was able to engage more with the local culinary scene around the Phoenix Valley and learn how to balance the needs of each sales sector. Learning how different farms around the country sold and marketed their products has been really helpful with my own business plan here in Connecticut”.

In her first year of operation, Stephanie is using this time to learn and experiment. “One of the biggest challenges for me this year was self-management. Being a one-woman operation with other professional commitments outside of the farm was definitely a learning curve. Prioritizing administrative tasks vs boots-on-the-ground farm work can be pretty difficult. I still have a way to go in learning how to balance the fieldwork with the office work, forcing myself to catch up on necessary paperwork even though there are beds that need to be weeded. ”

One element that proved to be particularly challenging this year was the weather. As the climate continues to change and become more and more unpredictable, farmers find themselves having to adapt to more severe weather events. “For me, this was a huge wake-up call in how I have to adapt my growing practices. During the storm a few weeks ago, I lost what was the beginning of my greenhouse and the ongoing drought has really forced me to think about my water use and how I am going to irrigate my crops for the future. I am already thinking about ways I can be more resilient on my farm in the face of climate change. I don’t think there is a single farmer that is unaffected by this issue and, as a community, we really need to come up with aggressive adaptation strategies”.

While learning what works and doesn’t’ work on her farm, Stephanie also had to balance the challenges of starting a new farm during the backdrop of a global pandemic. “Trying to start a farm during the COVID-19 pandemic has presented its own set of unique challenges to what I knew was already going to be a difficult endeavor, mainly having to reset my entire business plan to account for the disappearance of my potential wholesale customers and shift to direct to consumer sales. I wasn’t planning on opening an onsite store until year 2 as my original focus was on wholesale. I was lucky to have had some director to consumer sales to build off of”.

As farmers know all too well during these times – balancing the demand for fresh, local produce, and the importance of keeping your farm safe and healthy is no easy task and has given this industry a lot of uncertainty. Farmer-to-farmer mentorship is a central part of the Journey Person program model.  Stephanie has been working with her mentor Yoko Takemura at Assawaga Farm throughout the growing season.  Especially this year, when the pandemic limited face-to-face interactions, having a friend on the phone who has a similar scale and scope of farming operation can be invaluable.

Yoko Takemura of Assawaga Farm

“Speaking with my mentor, Yoko of Assawaga Farm, and discussing how they were changing up their marketing techniques in response to COVID gave me the confidence to step out of my comfort zone and approach new venues for sales. Knowing that I could text/call my mentor with questions added a nice sense of security and comfort during such an uncertain time”.

Despite these challenges during the first year of operation, Stephanie has enjoyed the process and is looking forward to the opportunities in the coming years. She has recently built a barn where she plans on hosting small to mid-sized events once it is safe to do so. “I think it is important to have other areas of cash flow on the farm when this pandemic is over. I’m very lucky to have the resources and support to put up this structure that can be used for not only cold storage for my crops but also to host events. I want this farm to serve my community with both nutritious foods and as a gathering place”.

Follow Stephanie and South Haven Farm on Instagram, Facebook, and on her website

Sefra Alexandra, the Seed Huntress, has launched her canoe from the headwaters of the Connecticut River and is paddling with an extraordinary cargo.

Her trip is to honor The Ecotype Project, a program of the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Connecticut (CT NOFA). She is carrying with her hundreds of native plants, cultivated as a result of CT NOFA’s Ecotype Project, and will be planting “the right plants in the right place.” She is paddling to raise funds and raise awareness about the vital connectivity between our wilderness areas and our farmland. She is paddling for the pollinators. She is paddling to plant native plants and highlight the habitat restoration work that strengthens our rivers, our forests, and our food system.

She is asking that you join with her by supporting CT NOFA during this weeklong expedition. Donate here. She carries with her the flag for WINGS WorldQuest. WINGS recognizes and supports extraordinary women leaders in science and exploration. Sefra is also supported by the Patagonia PUPS program, Spartan Race, and Planter’s Choice Nursery. Any support you can give will make you a part of CT NOFA’s work strengthening our agrarian landscape.

Follow live updates from Sefra on CT NOFA’s Instagram account: @ctnofa

 

Wilton High School Plant Sale (click to order)

Our spring native wildflower sale was such a success that we’ve partnered with Planters’ Choice Nursery again for a bigger and better fall sale! These aren’t just any native wildflowers, they’re from CT NOFA’s Ecotype Project, which means that they have a genetic heritage native to Connecticut and can’t be found anywhere else. When you purchase and install these plants, you are reintroducing biodiversity into our landscapes and therefore supporting the ecosystem services that sustain us. There’s nothing more fulfilling.

Fall 2020 Sale Details

These plants are available by preorder only- order online then pick up on Saturday, September 12.

Plants come as plugs approximately 2.5″ wide x 5″ deep and must be ordered in groups of 4 per species.

Cost per plant: $2.50 with $1 going directly to support WHS Organic Garden’s programs and initiatives.

ORDERS ARE DUE BY Wednesday, September 2 at 11:59 pm   

Pick up will be Saturday, September 12 between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm at The Hickories Farm (136 Lounsbury Rd, Ridgefield, CT 06877). All pickup procedures will be strictly aligned with Connecticut’s COVID-19 safety guidelines and restrictions.

Payment Instructions

We take payment in the form of Cash or Check:

Checks must be made out to WHS ACTIVITY FUND
In the note on the bottom of the check please write “Plant Plugs”

Orders can be dropped off at the main entrance of Wilton High School with Kim Ely or mailed to Jim Hunter / Wilton High School 395 Danbury Road, Wilton, CT. 06897

 

Aspetuck Plant Sale (click to order)

Order by September 17th
-while supplies last-

Curbside pickup or delivery on September 26th and 27th!

To help homeowners plant ‘Native Plants’ in our local area we are happy to provide the tools listed below. We hope you are inspired!

  • Garden planting plans, kits, and plants for a variety of sun and soil conditions.

  • Delivery to your home is optional, a suggested donation of $20 is requested to cover costs.

  • Four of Aspetuck Land Trust’s Landscape Partners are standing ready to provide planting services for you, call one of them for a free estimate. Landscape Partners Link: HERE!

  • 50% of your purchase is tax-deductible and a tax receipt is provided.

Please note: The plants are native, locally grown at Planter’s Choice in Newtown. They are native to our region and have been carefully selected to attract our local pollinators and wildlife.

Native Garden Plans & Kits

$48 – $464

Garden kits include a detailed garden plan and every plant you’ll need to plant a beautiful native garden in a variation of sizes, sun types, and soil types – find the perfect garden plan for your yard! VIEW HERE!

Native Shrubs and Trees

Prices ranging from $8 – $76

Each shrub and tree is sold in a 1, 2, 3, or 6 gallon pot. There are 15 varieties of trees and 33 varieties of shrubs.

VIEW HERE!

Ecotype Project.jpg

Native Perennials

$24 for 8 plugs

These perennials are native to the area and have been carefully selected to attract our local pollinators and wildlife. The majority of the perennials are from the Ecotype Project! These plugs are sold in increments of 8 (16, 24.. etc).

VIEW HERE!


Instructions to process your purchase:

  1. Open an empty shopping cart; keep one shopping cart open and add to it as you navigate our site and find plants you’d like to buy!

  2. Enter all items you’d like to purchase.

  3. Be sure to include a ticket for either curbside pickup or delivery.

    • Curbside pickup on September 25th or 26th at Earthplace, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, CT.
      Directions and a map will be provided in the lower right corner of your page during checkout.

    • Delivery to your home on September 25th or 26th suggested donation $20.
      A four-hour delivery window will be provided for your delivery.

  4. Follow the “Purchase” button at the bottom of the shopping cart when all items have been entered. The next page “Review your order” will open on your screen, please review your order in this screen to ensure that plants and quantities are correct. Quantities can be edited in this location prior to processing your payment.

  5. Your order total is summarized in the lower right hand of the “Review your order” page. If everything is correct click on “Continue to Your Info”.

  6. Follow the instructions in your confirmation email and receipt.

  • Those picking up will need to follow the link provided to Signup Genius and choose one available curbside pickup between 10 AM and 3:30 PM on September 26th & 27th. Pickup will be at Earthplace, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, CT. Only one pickup time is needed per customer.

  • Those choosing delivery will need to follow the link provided to Signup Genius Delivery and provide the necessary delivery details. You will be provided with a four-hour delivery window via email the week of September 26th. Deliveries will be made between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM.

Please Note: A separate email will be sent for each item chosen (each ticket item purchased).

50% of your purchase price will be a tax-deductible gift to the Aspetuck Land Trust.
Delivery donations are fully tax-deductible. A tax receipt will be provided.

Your support is needed more than ever! Donate today!

Making Farms Centers of Justice and Fairness https://www.agriculturaljusticeproject.org/en/donate/

The COVID -19 crisis has exposed minor cracks and deep craters in the US food supply chain, food security, and local food systems reliance, and resiliency. Farmers and farmworkers are “essential,” yet there is no requirement or financial support to provide them with masks, protective care, paid leave if they get sick, and safe, transportation, and housing with room for social distancing. Farms that adopt AJP Food Justice Certification have health and safety plans with training for all employees that are verified by third-party certifiers and farm operators with fair farm work policies. Since 1999, farmer and farmworker advocacy organizations; the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA), the Farm Worker Support Committee (CATA), and the Rural Advancement Foundation International USA (RAFI-USA) have been working together to keep the flame of fairness alive in the domestic food system, to empower workers and farmers, build capacity, educate the public, and create lasting partnerships across sectors. The not-for-profit organization, the Agricultural Justice Project, agriculturaljusticeproject.org emerged from this collaborative effort. A major part of our work is the creation and management of the Food Justice Certified (FJC) program, which allows consumers to connect with organic farms and food businesses that engage in high bar fair labor and trade practices, and sets this high bar against which other claims of fairness must measure themselves. AJP also offers farm operators cost-share for applying to be AJP Certified through our social fund.

Please make a difference today and donate to AJP! As a member of the large and diverse NOFA community across 7 states, your donation today will help where it is needed most, on the farm. Continue our dedicated efforts and accomplishments, please go to: https://www.agriculturaljusticeproject.org/en/donate/ And thank you for donating any amount!