The Virtual Tour of Massaro Community Farm is now available on CT NOFA’s YouTube Channel.

Here’s the LINK

The 1 hour video includes visits to Assawaga Farm and Sub Edge Farm, also participating as No-Till Research Farm Sites across Connecticut.

There is also a Rain Simulator presentation by Emily Cole, Climate and Agriculture Program Manager at American Farmland Trust. To view Emily’s entire presentation here’s the LINK

This event was funded by an NRCS Conservation Innovation Grant exploring best practices for tillage reduction on organic farms, managed in partnership between CT NOFA, NOFA/Mass, and NOFA-NJ.”

 

 

We recently had the opportunity to catch up with Stephanie Berluti, one of two farmers in our 2020 Journey Person program at her farm, South Haven Farm, in Orange, CT.

Stephanie officially started South Haven Farm in early 2020 where she grows crops including kale, radishes, carrots, tomatoes, collards, swiss chard, and flowers on a ½ acre of land using organic methods. She will also be starting microgreens for the fall and winter. While she is not yet USDA certified, Stephanie knows this is the direction she wants to take and is using her knowledge of organic practices from her farming experience while she begins the process of organic certification.

Stephanie spent the last 6 years traveling around the country and learning to grow in different climates and soil types culminating with the CT NOFA Journey Person program and the beginning of South Haven Farm.

“Having the opportunity to be a part of CT NOFA’s journeyperson program has given me a leg up in my first year of running my own operation, both financially and mentally. I was able to use my stipend to expand my cultivation tool kit by purchasing a garden tiller and a high-quality wheel hoe. The stipend allowed me to higher quality tools at a greater cost that will last ions longer than the cheaper version that I would probably hate and replace within my first few years”.

She began her farming career as an apprentice at Serenbe Farms outside of Atlanta, GA, then spent a season farming by the beach on Martha’s Vineyard at North Tabor Farm. Stephanie then honed her market garden farming skills at Steadfast Farm in Phoenix, AZ as their assistant farm manager. Finally, in 2018, Stephanie returned to Connecticut where she is currently the NY/CT gardener for Green City Growers (based in Boston) where she manages the 30 Rock Chef’s Garden for the Rainbow Room in NYC. However, due to COVID all of those sites were placed on hold this year.

These diverse farming experiences were invaluable in starting her own farm operation. “I don’t know if I would have had the confidence to begin a project like this without the knowledge I gained from those farms”. It wasn’t only knowledge of growing practices that were valuable for Stephanie, but also business practices and consumer engagement. “I learned a lot from the different ways these farms marketed and sold their products. In Atlanta, since I worked on a farm located in an Agri-hood (planned community based around a farm) we focused more on direct to consumer sales and building personal relationships with families in the community through educational programs and events. At Steadfast Farm in Arizona, I was able to engage more with the local culinary scene around the Phoenix Valley and learn how to balance the needs of each sales sector. Learning how different farms around the country sold and marketed their products has been really helpful with my own business plan here in Connecticut”.

In her first year of operation, Stephanie is using this time to learn and experiment. “One of the biggest challenges for me this year was self-management. Being a one-woman operation with other professional commitments outside of the farm was definitely a learning curve. Prioritizing administrative tasks vs boots-on-the-ground farm work can be pretty difficult. I still have a way to go in learning how to balance the fieldwork with the office work, forcing myself to catch up on necessary paperwork even though there are beds that need to be weeded. ”

One element that proved to be particularly challenging this year was the weather. As the climate continues to change and become more and more unpredictable, farmers find themselves having to adapt to more severe weather events. “For me, this was a huge wake-up call in how I have to adapt my growing practices. During the storm a few weeks ago, I lost what was the beginning of my greenhouse and the ongoing drought has really forced me to think about my water use and how I am going to irrigate my crops for the future. I am already thinking about ways I can be more resilient on my farm in the face of climate change. I don’t think there is a single farmer that is unaffected by this issue and, as a community, we really need to come up with aggressive adaptation strategies”.

While learning what works and doesn’t’ work on her farm, Stephanie also had to balance the challenges of starting a new farm during the backdrop of a global pandemic. “Trying to start a farm during the COVID-19 pandemic has presented its own set of unique challenges to what I knew was already going to be a difficult endeavor, mainly having to reset my entire business plan to account for the disappearance of my potential wholesale customers and shift to direct to consumer sales. I wasn’t planning on opening an onsite store until year 2 as my original focus was on wholesale. I was lucky to have had some director to consumer sales to build off of”.

As farmers know all too well during these times – balancing the demand for fresh, local produce, and the importance of keeping your farm safe and healthy is no easy task and has given this industry a lot of uncertainty. Farmer-to-farmer mentorship is a central part of the Journey Person program model.  Stephanie has been working with her mentor Yoko Takemura at Assawaga Farm throughout the growing season.  Especially this year, when the pandemic limited face-to-face interactions, having a friend on the phone who has a similar scale and scope of farming operation can be invaluable.

Yoko Takemura of Assawaga Farm

“Speaking with my mentor, Yoko of Assawaga Farm, and discussing how they were changing up their marketing techniques in response to COVID gave me the confidence to step out of my comfort zone and approach new venues for sales. Knowing that I could text/call my mentor with questions added a nice sense of security and comfort during such an uncertain time”.

Despite these challenges during the first year of operation, Stephanie has enjoyed the process and is looking forward to the opportunities in the coming years. She has recently built a barn where she plans on hosting small to mid-sized events once it is safe to do so. “I think it is important to have other areas of cash flow on the farm when this pandemic is over. I’m very lucky to have the resources and support to put up this structure that can be used for not only cold storage for my crops but also to host events. I want this farm to serve my community with both nutritious foods and as a gathering place”.

Follow Stephanie and South Haven Farm on Instagram, Facebook, and on her website

Wilton High School Plant Sale (click to order)

Our spring native wildflower sale was such a success that we’ve partnered with Planters’ Choice Nursery again for a bigger and better fall sale! These aren’t just any native wildflowers, they’re from CT NOFA’s Ecotype Project, which means that they have a genetic heritage native to Connecticut and can’t be found anywhere else. When you purchase and install these plants, you are reintroducing biodiversity into our landscapes and therefore supporting the ecosystem services that sustain us. There’s nothing more fulfilling.

Fall 2020 Sale Details

These plants are available by preorder only- order online then pick up on Saturday, September 12.

Plants come as plugs approximately 2.5″ wide x 5″ deep and must be ordered in groups of 4 per species.

Cost per plant: $2.50 with $1 going directly to support WHS Organic Garden’s programs and initiatives.

ORDERS ARE DUE BY Wednesday, September 2 at 11:59 pm   

Pick up will be Saturday, September 12 between 9:00 am and 3:00 pm at The Hickories Farm (136 Lounsbury Rd, Ridgefield, CT 06877). All pickup procedures will be strictly aligned with Connecticut’s COVID-19 safety guidelines and restrictions.

Payment Instructions

We take payment in the form of Cash or Check:

Checks must be made out to WHS ACTIVITY FUND
In the note on the bottom of the check please write “Plant Plugs”

Orders can be dropped off at the main entrance of Wilton High School with Kim Ely or mailed to Jim Hunter / Wilton High School 395 Danbury Road, Wilton, CT. 06897

 

Aspetuck Plant Sale (click to order)

Order by September 17th
-while supplies last-

Curbside pickup or delivery on September 26th and 27th!

To help homeowners plant ‘Native Plants’ in our local area we are happy to provide the tools listed below. We hope you are inspired!

  • Garden planting plans, kits, and plants for a variety of sun and soil conditions.

  • Delivery to your home is optional, a suggested donation of $20 is requested to cover costs.

  • Four of Aspetuck Land Trust’s Landscape Partners are standing ready to provide planting services for you, call one of them for a free estimate. Landscape Partners Link: HERE!

  • 50% of your purchase is tax-deductible and a tax receipt is provided.

Please note: The plants are native, locally grown at Planter’s Choice in Newtown. They are native to our region and have been carefully selected to attract our local pollinators and wildlife.

Native Garden Plans & Kits

$48 – $464

Garden kits include a detailed garden plan and every plant you’ll need to plant a beautiful native garden in a variation of sizes, sun types, and soil types – find the perfect garden plan for your yard! VIEW HERE!

Native Shrubs and Trees

Prices ranging from $8 – $76

Each shrub and tree is sold in a 1, 2, 3, or 6 gallon pot. There are 15 varieties of trees and 33 varieties of shrubs.

VIEW HERE!

Ecotype Project.jpg

Native Perennials

$24 for 8 plugs

These perennials are native to the area and have been carefully selected to attract our local pollinators and wildlife. The majority of the perennials are from the Ecotype Project! These plugs are sold in increments of 8 (16, 24.. etc).

VIEW HERE!


Instructions to process your purchase:

  1. Open an empty shopping cart; keep one shopping cart open and add to it as you navigate our site and find plants you’d like to buy!

  2. Enter all items you’d like to purchase.

  3. Be sure to include a ticket for either curbside pickup or delivery.

    • Curbside pickup on September 25th or 26th at Earthplace, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, CT.
      Directions and a map will be provided in the lower right corner of your page during checkout.

    • Delivery to your home on September 25th or 26th suggested donation $20.
      A four-hour delivery window will be provided for your delivery.

  4. Follow the “Purchase” button at the bottom of the shopping cart when all items have been entered. The next page “Review your order” will open on your screen, please review your order in this screen to ensure that plants and quantities are correct. Quantities can be edited in this location prior to processing your payment.

  5. Your order total is summarized in the lower right hand of the “Review your order” page. If everything is correct click on “Continue to Your Info”.

  6. Follow the instructions in your confirmation email and receipt.

  • Those picking up will need to follow the link provided to Signup Genius and choose one available curbside pickup between 10 AM and 3:30 PM on September 26th & 27th. Pickup will be at Earthplace, 10 Woodside Lane, Westport, CT. Only one pickup time is needed per customer.

  • Those choosing delivery will need to follow the link provided to Signup Genius Delivery and provide the necessary delivery details. You will be provided with a four-hour delivery window via email the week of September 26th. Deliveries will be made between 9:00 AM and 4:00 PM.

Please Note: A separate email will be sent for each item chosen (each ticket item purchased).

50% of your purchase price will be a tax-deductible gift to the Aspetuck Land Trust.
Delivery donations are fully tax-deductible. A tax receipt will be provided.

Thanks to the hard work of those advocating for agriculture, the EIDL loan program is now accepting applications from farmers.

Farmers: Click here to apply.

 

 

This award is for a recipient who has demonstrated the advancement of organic living on our earth with a project, innovation, action or lifestyle that supports the continuation of the life work of Bill Duesing – for all to live on this earth in a society in harmony with nature. The accomplishment must contribute to the advancement of organic living in Connecticut in a demonstrable way and be a current or recent accomplishment that reflects Bill’s devotion to organic living and his wish that this critically important work be continued by his friends and colleagues. Award recipients can be one of the following:

• Organic farmer/farm (example: added new revenue sources to secure the farm’s future; expanded availability of organic food in the community)

• Organic land care professional /business (example: transitioned from conventional to organic land care)

• Organic advocate (example: spearheaded a change in their local school system, or worked to promote organic legislation)

• Organization (example: farmers market became 100% organic; the advancement of farmworkers’ rights; created organic-based social media group)

• Educator (example: developed new ways to add organic food and agriculture to school curriculum)

• Mentor (example: developed process for passing along organic knowledge and skills to new farmers or land care professionals)

Award recipient(s) will be recognized during the Keynote Session at CT NOFA’s 2020 Winter Conference on Saturday, March 7th at Wesleyan University in Middletown.

Click here to nominate

Click here to print mail-in form

CT NOFA’s 38th annual conference will be held on March 7th, 2020 at Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut.  This new location will allow easier access to this event for people from all over our state as well as guests from Massachusetts and Rhode Island and New York. Our keynote speaker is Niaz Dorry of the National Farm Family Coalition and the Northwest Atlantic Marine Alliance who will be bringing her innovative perspective on movement-building to her keynote speech. To round out this wonderful day we are requesting proposals for workshop sessions, each will be 1.5 hours in length. CT NOFA is looking for inventive, inclusive, and diverse topics, as always.

 

We welcome all submissions for workshops that capture CT NOFA’s mission of fostering the organic movement in Connecticut.  This year our conference priorities are: 

  • Climate Change, and Resilience, and Conservation Agriculture
  • Regional Economics and New Farming Economies
  • Land Access
  • Beginning Farmers 
  • Equity, Ag Justice, and Food
  • Emerging Markets (ie; kelp, hemp, cannabis)

 

The deadline for workshop submissions is  January 15th. Applications will be subject to review and presenters will be notified of their acceptance by January 24th.  

 

At the Summer Conference workshop on Fermenting Social Justice Values in the NOFA Culture,  the guidelines that the NOFA Domestic Fair Trade sub-committee holds were reviewed and it was agreed upon that information about dismantling racism in farming be included with our RFP.  This gives our presenters the chance to consider these ideas when they design their presentation. Please see ‘Dismantling Racism and Integrating Race and Equity for NOFA Presenters at Conferences‘ document.

 

Please follow this link to our online workshop submission form.  

We look forward to seeing you at OrganiConn 2020!

 

CT NOFA Invites Beginning Farmers and Land Care Professionals to Apply for the Journeyperson Program. Applications Due on October 15th. APPLY HERE

The Journeyperson Program strives to provide committed beginning farmers and land care professionals with the opportunity to learn skills and gain the experience they will need to succeed as farmers and business owners. 

 

The Journeyperson program strives to support land stewards in the education gap between apprentice and independent business owner and to provide resources and opportunities for prospective new farmers/land care professionals who have completed an apprenticeship to further develop skills they need to operate independently.  The program is shaped by the interests and goals of individual participants. New land stewards are able to gain advanced experience, skills, and perspective in a supportive environment while also becoming part of a sustainable professional network.

 

Each Journeyperson, once selected, is matched with a mentor.  These arrangements are flexible and are shaped collaboratively by the journeyperson and the mentor.  Some mentors also offer access to land, equipment, and support so a journeyperson can operate independently.

 

Additional resources/requirements for journey people include:

  • attendance at an Organic Land Care accreditation course (full scholarship included)
  • educational/capital stipends up to $2,000
  • attendance at 2 NOFA Winter Conferences – CT and one other (full scholarship included)
  • if applicable, organic certification assistance (4 hours of consulting with a USDA inspector)
  • completing a full business plan
  • attending regular mentor meetings
  • check-ins with CT NOFA staff about progress

Timeline for 2019-2020 program:

Sept 13, 2019: Application open

October 15, 2019: Application closed

October 25, 2019: Decisions published

November 11-15, 2019: OLC Course Attendance

March 7, 2020: CT Winter Conference Attendance

Spring 2020: Entrance interview and mentorship pairing

Spring/Summer/Fall:

  • Mentor meetings
  • NOFA check-ins
  • Stipend disbursements

November 1, 2020:

  • Full business plan submitted
  • Exit interview

 

Learn more here

Landscaping professionals transitioning to organic practices and those already using chemical-free options and want to learn more are invited to attend the NOFA (Northeast Organic Farming Association) Accreditation Course in Organic Land Care, a 30-hour professional training and accreditation course to be held at Common Ground High School in New Haven on August 19, 20, 21, & 22 2019. This is the first of two Accreditation Courses being offered in Connecticut in 2019. The second one will be held between November 11-14, location TBD and will run concurrently in English and Spanish. With grant funding from The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, Connecticut-based land care professionals can attend the course tuition-free.

 

For the first time, the Organic Land Care Program’s November course will be held concurrently in English and Spanish. According to the National Hispanic Landscaping Alliance, 35% of the landscape and lawn care professionals in the U.S. are Spanish speakers. Connecticut’s Spanish speaking community alone stands at 540,000. With little organic landscaping resources for Spanish speaking landscapers, NOFA has translated our Standards for Organic Land Care into Spanish and is aspiring to translate all of our educational materials in 2019 and 2020. Funding from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Long Island Sound Futures Fund provides these materials, along with the organic land care training in November, free of charge, thus eliminating a barrier to entry for many landscapers.

 

The curriculum includes soil health and soil testing, site analysis, green stormwater infrastructure, plant care, disease control, organic turf, and more.

 

Those who pass the accreditation exam on the final day of the course become Accredited Organic Land Care Professionals (AOLCPs), the only professional organic landscaping credential in the country.  The course content is based on the NOFA Standards for Organic Land Care (accepted under the International Federation of Organic Agricultural Movements (IFOAM).

 

Demand for organic land care professionals is increasing due to a growing concern about the hazards of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides and the adoption of ordinances banning or restricting the use of chemical pesticides on town and/or private land around Connecticut, New England, and the rest of the country. Notably, the City of Portland, Maine passed a pesticide ordinance that restricts the use of synthetic pesticides on all public and private property in 2018. In Connecticut, there are already laws in place that ban the use of pesticides on the grounds of schools and day care centers and, more recently, a ban on automatic pesticide misters.

 

Landscaping professionals in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, and other New England states increasingly consider this course a crucial investment in distinguishing themselves as highly trained experts, meeting demand in the growing market for non-toxic and organic landscaping services. Since 2002, The NOFA Accreditation Course in Organic Land Care has been the definitive professional training course for landscapers, lawn care specialists, municipal groundskeepers, landscape architects, and environmental educators to learn best practices for organic land stewardship.

 

While organic landscaping practices are increasing in popularity and there continues to be more demand for organic services in the landscaping industry, there remains a glaring lack of trained landscaping professionals who can offer such services. Landscapers keen on offering organic services to clients, transitioning land in their care to an organic program, and wanting to use non-toxic landscaping practices will benefit from the curriculum of this training.

 

The course runs from 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. each day and can accommodate up to 60 students. Those who don’t qualify for a free space can register for $600; however, current AOLCPs and their employees can attend for $500. Group discounts and payment plans are available. For more details, to request a free space, or for general information about upcoming courses, contact The Northeast Organic Farming Association (CT NOFA) office at 203-408-6819, email jeremy@ctnofa.org, or visit www.organiclandcare.net.