CT NOFA eNewsletter
December 2, 2006
v.2 no.8
Join CT NOFA!
Learn about the benefits of membership at http://www.ctnofa.org/Join.htm
Sign up for the e-Newsletter, please send an email to: janet@ctnofa.org

 

In this Issue:

Upcoming CT NOFA Events
December 14, Organic Land Care Update Course
January 13, Getting Started in Organic Farming Conference
January 31, February 1, 2, 5 and 6, 2007, 5 Day Course in Organic Land Care
February 10, Community Farming Conference
March 10, 2007, Cultivating an Organic Connecticut Conference

Upcoming NOFA Related Events
Dec. 2, Fiddleheads Natural Food Coop Public Meeting
Dec. 5, CRCOG "Listening Session" #1
Dec. 7-9, Advanced hands-on cheese making course
Dec. 9, Open Farm Day & Farm Brunch
Dec. 11, CRCOG "Listening Session" #2
Dec 13, Better Market Sales Through Display and Merchandising
Dec. 13, CRCOG "Listening Session" #3
Dec. 17, Wreath Making
Jan 9 & 10, 23, 24, and Feb 6 & 7, Tilling the Soil of Opportunity
Jan 20, 20th Annual NOFA Winter Conference - Worcester, MA
Jan 26, 27 & 28, NOFA-NY's 2007 Annual Conference
Feb 10, An Introduction to Growing Apples in the Home Garden
Feb 10, Pruning and Training Apple Trees, A Hands-On Workshop
Feb 24, An Introduction to Stone-Fruit Trees In the Home Garden
Feb 24, Pruning Stone-Fruit Trees, A Hands-On Workshop
Feb 28 – Mar 1, New England Farmers' Direct Marketing Conference and Trade Show
Mar 1-3, ELA 2007 WINTER CONFERENCE & ECO-MARKETPLACE
Mar 10, Growing Stone-Fruit in the Home Garden, Beyond Basics
Mar 10, Advanced Pruning and Training of Stone-Fruit Trees
Mar 24, Growing Apples in the Home Garden, Beyond Basics
Mar 24, Grafting Apple Trees, A Hands-On Workshop
Mar 31, An Introduction to Growing Berries in the Home Garden
Mar 31, Pruning Blueberries and Raspberries, A Hands-On Workshop
Apr 7, An Introduction to Growing Table and Wine Grapes
Apr 7, Pruning and Training Grape Vines, A Hands-On Workshop
Apr 21, Growing Apples Organically
Apr 21, Monitoring and Diagnosing Pest Problems in the Home Orchard
Apr 27 - Apr 28, Pfeiffer Center Organic Beekeeping Workshop
Apr 28, Managing Fruit Pests in the Home Garden
Apr 28, Monitoring and Diagnosing Pest Problems in the Home Orchard
July 11-14, The Second National Conference on Facilitating Sustainable Agriculture Education
Aug 10-12, NOFA Summer Conference

Community Board
Request for Workshop Presenters for the 2007 NOFA Summer Conference
Volunteer for CT NOFA
Work for CT NOFA
Established Organic Farm, Farm Stand and CSA business for rent or sale
FOR SALE: THE BENSON PLACE - A 38-ACRE HILLTOP WORKING WILD BLUEBERRY FARM
Raw Wool Needed
Dr. Bargyla Rateaver, 1916 - 2006

News and Stories
Open space grants protect farmland!!
Pennsylvania and New Jersey Stand Against Sweatshops
A Growing Trend: Small, Local and Organic
Let’s get real, and all commit to using organic seed
The Vegetable-Industrial Complex
Biotech Rice Puts Harvest At Risk
Online Analysis of the Bird Flu Pandemic
Organic Farmer Jon Tester Elected to United States Senate
DECODING MEAT LABELS FOR THE SENSITIVE CARNIVORE
THE MEATRIX 2.5!

Upcoming CT NOFA Events
December 14
Organic Land Care Update Course, Tolland CT. Native Plant Communities of the Northeast Ted Elliman of the New England Wildflower Society. Conservation Grazing to Control Invasives Lisa Wojan of Exmoor Ponies of North America. Plant Physiology: Energy, Timing, and Essential Elements for Woody Plants Dr. Kevin T. Smith of the USDA Forest Service Common Diseases of Juniper and Rose in the Landscape Sharon Douglas of the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station. Registration for NOFA AOLCPs only until November 15
Registration for the general public after November 15. http://www.organiclandcare.net/events/Update.php

January 13
Getting Started in Organic Farming Conference, New Haven.  Featuring many CT NOFA farmers.  CT Agricultural Experiment Station, 123 Huntington St, New Haven.


January 31, February 1, 2, 5 and 6, 2007
5 Day Course in Organic Land Care,
New Haven, Connecticut. An intensive course on organic landscaping. Optional test at end for NOFA Organic Land Care Professional Accreditation. http://www.organiclandcare.net/events/6thannual5day.php

February 10
Community Farming Conference, Speakers:  Lynda Simkins of the Natick Community Organic Farm, on combining educational programs and farming, and Elizabeth Henderson, author of Sharing the Harvest, on starting up a Community Supported Agriculture project.  Mercy Center 167 Neck Road in Madison CT. For more information, contact Kim Stoner, 203-974-8480, Kimberly.Stoner@po.state.ct.us.

March 10, 2007
Cultivating an Organic Connecticut Conference with keynote speakers Nancy Jack Todd and John Todd http://www.ctnofa.org/events/CaOC.php

Upcoming NOFA Related Events
Dec. 2
Fiddleheads Natural Food Coop Public Meeting 10am - 12 pm. new London Market. Huntington Street, new London. This informaitonal meeting is for members and any one interested in finding out more aout Fiddleheads. A sampling of vendors will be on hand displaying their products. www.fiddleheadsfood.coop sara (860) 984-3488

Dec. 5
CRCOG "Listening Session" #1 Fruit and vegetable crops, nursery, greenhouse, flowers, livestock, dairy, honey, and other wholesale products. CRCOG invites area farmers to attend one of three upcoming "Listening Sessions" to discuss their concerns about local land use regulations, policies and enforcement. Comments will be used to help draft model regulations to be completed next summer.  Each meeting will be held from 6:00 to 8:30 pm at the Connecticut Farm Bureau's main office at 775 Bloomfield Avenue in Windsor. A light supper prepared with locally grown and produced foods will be served. For more information, contact Rebecca Augur at (860) 522-2217 x29 or raugur@crcog.org. If you can not attend but wish to submit comments, please send those to Rebecca as well.

Dec. 7-9
Advanced hands-on cheese making course is planned for 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Agri-Business Center at Morrisville State College. The class is geared for cheesemakers that have gone through a cheese making class. Instruction by Peter Dixon will include more in-depth information about cheese varieties, cultures, brining, storage and more. Cost for the course is $300 and includes an instrutional handbook with recipes, as well as lunch and morning and afternoon snacks. For more information or to register, contact Rebecca Schuelke at (607) 316-3249 or rebeccaschuelke@yahoo.com.

Dec. 9
Open Farm Day & Farm Brunch 10 am – 12:30 pm. Common Ground, 358 Springside Ave, New Haven, CT 06515, 203-389-4333 www.nhep.com nhep@nhep.com The farm is quiet and peaceful in early winter. Enjoy visiting the animals and learning about how we prepare the farm for winter. Brunch at 11 a.m. made with Common Ground-grown products. Pre-registration appreciated, $5 for ages 6 through Adult (ages 5 and under are free)

Dec. 11
CRCOG "Listening Session" #2 Retailer oriented-farmers' market participants, farm-stand operators and value-added product businesses, such as cheese and preserves.CRCOG invites area farmers to attend one of three upcoming "Listening Sessions" to discuss their concerns about local land use regulations, policies and enforcement. Comments will be used to help draft model regulations to be completed next summer.  Each meeting will be held from 6:00 to 8:30 pm at the Connecticut Farm Bureau's main office at 775 Bloomfield Avenue in Windsor. A light supper prepared with locally grown and produced foods will be served. For more information, contact Rebecca Augur at (860) 522-2217 x29 or raugur@crcog.org. If you can not attend but wish to submit comments, please send those to Rebecca as well.

December 13
Better Market Sales Through Display and Merchandising
6 p.m. at CISA, 1 Sugarloaf Street, South Deerfield. Join farmers market vendors, managers and local farmers to learn and discuss ways to increase your sales through improved display and merchandising techniques. Guest speakers Gideon and Sarah Porth of Atlas Farm will discuss the display techniques they use to boost sales at their Boston-area farmers markets. A round table discussion among attendees will follow. Free dinner. Registration required by Monday, December 11. Call Jennifer to register and get directions, 413-665-7100.

Dec. 13
CRCOG "Listening Session" #3 Agri-Tourism Operators-sugarhouses, wineries, orchards, tree farms, "pick your own" fields and other businesses with seasonal visitors. CRCOG invites area farmers to attend one of three upcoming "Listening Sessions" to discuss their concerns about local land use regulations, policies and enforcement. Comments will be used to help draft model regulations to be completed next summer.  Each meeting will be held from 6:00 to 8:30 pm at the Connecticut Farm Bureau's main office at 775 Bloomfield Avenue in Windsor. A light supper prepared with locally grown and produced foods will be served. For more information, contact Rebecca Augur at (860) 522-2217 x29 or raugur@crcog.org. If you can not attend but wish to submit comments, please send those to Rebecca as well.

Dec. 17
Wreath Making 2 pm – 5 pm Common Ground, 358 Springside Ave, New Haven, CT 06515, 203-389-4333 www.nhep.com nhep@nhep.com. Welcome winter by making fresh, fragrant wreaths from evergreen branches and other seasonal decorations. Materials and instruction provided. Tools available, but bringing your own scissors, wire cutters, and clippers may be useful. Pre-registration appreciated, $5 per wreath

Jan 9 & 10, 23, 24, and Feb 6 & 7
Tilling the Soil of Opportunity
agricultural entrepreneurship business plan training course this spring. Sessions are held at the Dutchess County Cornell Cooperative Extension building at 2715 Rte. 44, in Millbrook, NY. The six-day course (three 2-day sessions) is designed for people who are searching for innovative ideas and enhanced marketing opportunities in the area of value-added agriculture and food. Over 50 entrepreneurs or potential entrepreneurs have completed the practical training program, which has been offered five times. The hours are Tuesdays, noon-9 p.m. and Wednesdays from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Each session builds on the previous ones. Each two-day session covers several topics. They include: "Taking Stock of Your Resources"; "Business Concept", "Mission and Goals"; "Legal Structure" (regulations, contracts and leases); "Management from the Ground Up"; "Marketing Issues"; "Marketing Strategies"; "Budgeting"; "Record Keeping and Accounting"; "Cash Flow and Financial Statements"; "Financing"; and "Business Growth Issues and Strategies". Instructor Bob Weybright, of Dutchess County Cooperative Extension is a business and marketing specialist with over 25 years in the food business. At each session, guest speakers such as small business attorneys, bankers, insurance agents, and marketing specialists with experience serving the farming community will be available for consultation. The workshop brochure can be viewed at http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/hp/events/detail.php?id=33 For more information about the workshop contact: Cheryl Leach at 315-787-2622 or cal35@cornell.edu. To register contact: Nancy Halas at 845-677-8223 or nh26@cornell.edu. For more information about NxLeveL visit: http://www.nxlevel.org

January 20
20th Annual Northeast Organic Farming Association Winter Conference Bancroft School in Worcester, MA http://www.nofamass.org/conferences/w2007/index.php

January 26, 27 & 28
NOFA-NY's 2007 Annual Conference Building the Farm Economy around Local Foods. Holiday Inn, Syracuse/Liverpool, NY http://nofany.org/events/2007conference/nofanyconference07.htm

February 10
An Introduction to Growing Apples in the Home Garden Brooksby Orchard, Peabody, MA, 9:00 AM - Noon, The visual experience of flowering fruit trees in the home landscape is surpassed only by the delicious variety of summer and fall fruits which they produce. Growing apples successfully can be a horticultural challenge, but it can be done! Dr. Wes Autio will present an in-depth program on how to grow apples in the home landscape. Varieties, rootstocks, young-tree care, nutrition, training, and pest control will be covered. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

February 10
Pruning and Training Apple Trees, A Hands-On Workshop
Brooksby Orchard, Peabody, MA 1:30 PM - 3:30 PM. Pruning and training apple trees are often challenging: where to make the first cut? In the pruning workshop, Dr. Wes Autio will guide participants through the step-by-step annual process of pruning apples. Participants will have the opportunity to conduct actual pruning and gain both experience and confidence in pruning fruit trees in order to produce a bountiful crop. This workshop will be entirely out of doors, please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Some pruning tools will be available for pruning workshops, but please bring your own if possible. Tuition = $40 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

February 24
An Introduction to Stone-Fruit Trees In the Home Garden
Tougas Family Farm, Northborough, MA 9:00 AM - Noon Although we are on the northern edge of successful stone-fruit growing country, nothing beats the mid-summer taste of home-grown peaches, nectarines, plums, and cherries. Culture is surprisingly easy if you follow the suggestions presented by Mr. Clements in this seminar. Site and variety/rootstock selection, nutritional needs, and pest management recommendations will be covered to insure your success in growing these worthwhile tree fruit. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

February 24
Pruning Stone-Fruit Trees, A Hands-On Workshop
Tougas Family Farm, Northborough, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Pruning stone fruit is not the same as apples, although arguably easier. This hands-on workshop is an opportunity to learn from the pros how to prune peaches, nectarines, plums, and cherries to achieve a good balance of vegetative growth, fruit buds, and tree health. This workshop will be entirely out of doors, please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Some pruning tools will be available for pruning workshops, but please bring your own if possible. Tuition = $40 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

February 28 – March 1
New England Farmers' Direct Marketing Conference and Trade Show: Successful Strategies for Growing Your Farm Business Sturbridge Host Hotel, Sturbridge , Massachusetts Register Now On-Line: http://www.harvestnewengland.org/conference/index.htm

March 1-3
ELA 2007 WINTER CONFERENCE & ECO-MARKETPLACE
SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPES: CREATING HEALTHY COMMUNITIESMassMutual Center, Springfield, MA ELA (Ecological Landscaping Association) presents: a full day Pre-Conference intensive with Dr. Elaine Ingham, Soil Foodweb on March 1, 2007 and our 13th annual Winter Conference & Eco-Marketplace on March 2 & 3, 2007. This premier event includes 25 workshops presented by preeminent educators, writers, and practitioners in the field of ecological landscaping today. With over 30 exhibitors and live demonstrations, the Eco-Marketplace showcases landscape techniques, information, products and services needed to create and manage healthy communities. Further information is available at www.ecolandscaping.org or call 617-436-5838.

March 10
Growing Stone-Fruit in the Home Garden, Beyond Basics
UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 9:00 AM - Noon Advanced topics on growing stone fruit in the home garden will be the subject of this seminar designed for homeowners and enthusiasts with previous experience growing peaches, nectarines, plums, or cherries. Site and variety/rootstock selection, nutritional needs, and pest management recommendations will be reviewed, then a more in-depth look at varieties, training systems, advanced pest management, and preventing early decline will be discussed. Attendees are encouraged to bring specific problems or questions for the benefit of the class. This workshop will be at least partially out of doors, so please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

March 10
Advanced Pruning and Training of Stone-Fruit Trees
UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Advanced pruning and training of stone fruit will focus on horticultural techniques that will insure healthy trees, high annual yields, and make your trees the envy of your neighbors. Designed for those that already have some experience pruning and training stone fruit, we will look at various stone fruit training ‘systems’ such as open-center, central-leader, perpendicular-V, etc. Pruning and training of young trees will also be a focus. This workshop will be entirely out of doors, please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Some pruning tools will be available for pruning workshops, but please bring your own if possible. Tuition = $40 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

March 24
Growing Apples in the Home Garden, Beyond Basics
UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 9:00 AM - Noon If you understand and have mastered the basics of growing apples in the home garden, it is time to progress to some of the more sophisticated and truly fun horticultural techniques. Dr. Wes Autio will present a program on advanced training of apple trees, including techniques which manipulate growth and fruiting and planting systems which are space and input efficient. These are techniques with which you can impress your neighbors! This workshop will be at least partially out of doors, so please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

March 24
Grafting Apple Trees, A Hands-On Workshop UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Many people do not realize that all apple varieties are reproduced by grafting – they do not grow true from seed. For horticultural enthusiasts, one of the most satisfying techniques to master is grafting. Dr. Wes Autio will present a hands-on workshop on “bench grafting” and “cleft grafting” of apple trees. Other grafting techniques will be discussed. All participants in the workshop will graft their own apple tree to take home with them. This workshop will be at least partially out of doors, so please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

March 31
An Introduction to Growing Berries in the Home Garden Tougas Family Farm, Northborough, MA 9:00 AM - Noon Edible Landscaping has been gaining popularity in recent years. Many types of berries fit well into an edible home landscape. The pleasure of walking out to the backyard berry patch for a sweet handful of berries is matched with some surprising ornamental qualities offered by these plants. Ms. Sonia Schloemann will present an in-depth program on how to grow various types of berries in the home landscape. Site and soil requirements, planting systems, cultural practices and pest control will be covered. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

March 31
Pruning Blueberries and Raspberries, A Hands-On Workshop Tougas Family Farm, Northborough, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Pruning berries can be confusing. What if I cut the wrong thing? In the pruning workshop, Ms. Sonia Schloemann will help participants understand the general principles of pruning blueberries and raspberries. Participants will have the chance for hands-on experience in pruning some bushes after receiving instruction in how it is done. This workshop will be entirely out of doors, please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Some pruning tools will be available for pruning workshops, but please bring your own if possible. Tuition = $40 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

April 7
An Introduction to Growing Table and Wine Grapes
UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 9:00 AM - Noon Grapes are one of the most universally-enjoyed fruits available. Many of the new varieties now available have excellent taste, are winter hardy and can make excellent wine. Grapes are fun to grow but present some challenges. Dr. Duane Greene will help participants through the basics and give them the tools to avoid some of the challenges. Specific topics will include selecting varieties, planting, fertilizing, controlling pests, pruning, and training that can be used to grow both table and wine grapes successfully. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

April 7
Pruning and Training Grape Vines, A Hands-On Workshop UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Producing that perfect grape to be pressed and fermented or for out-of-hand eating requires annual pruning. In the pruning workshop, Dr. Duane Greene will guide participants through the step-by-step annual process of pruning and training grapes. Participants will have the opportunity to conduct actual pruning and gain both experience and confidence in pruning and training grapes in order to produce a bountiful crop. This workshop will be entirely out of doors, please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Some pruning tools will be available for pruning workshops, but please bring your own if possible. Tuition = $40 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

April 21
Growing Apples Organically Brooksby Orchard, Peabody, MA 9:00 AM - Noon Controlling the varied and numerous pests is the most challenging aspect of growing apples in the home garden. Drs. Dan Cooley and Bill Coli will help participants gain a solid overview of how to identify the key disease, insect, mite, and vertebrate pests that must be controlled to produce a crop of high-quality fruit. Organic approaches to pest management will be discussed in detail. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

April 21
Monitoring and Diagnosing Pest Problems in the Home Orchard Brooksby Orchard, Peabody, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Being able to identify pest problems and monitor pest activity will make you the envy of your neighborhood. You likely will wonder if this ability is a good thing when your neighbors start to bring you all sorts of rotting, diseased, and insect-infested fruits, but it is integral to good pest management. In this hands-on workshop, Drs. Dan Cooley and Bill Coli will show you how to identify pests and use traps and other techniques to monitor their activity. This workshop will be at least partially out of doors, so please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

April 27 - April 28
Pfeiffer Center Organic Beekeeping Workshop
260 Hungry Hollow Road, Chestnut Ridge, New York, 10977 A workshop for active beekeepers as well as for beginners including a hands-on session. In this workshop we will look at the bee colony as an organism and what it needs in order to further its health and vitality. Lots of practical advice and demonstrations will give novices enough information to get started with their own hive, and encourage experienced beekeepers to adopt organic procedure. Friday April 27, 2007, 4:30pm to 9 pm and Saturday April 28, 2007, 9am to 6pm Optional Beginner Session - This will provide a very basic introduction to the hive and the honeybee, and is recommended for those with little practical experience in beekeeping. 2pm, Friday, April 27, 2007 For More Information on this event please send email to beework@pfeiffercenter.org or call 845-352 5020 ext.20
or visit our website http://www.pfeiffercenter.org

April 28
Managing Fruit Pests in the Home Garden UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 9:00 AM - Noon Not controlling pests is the most common reason for failure to produce high-quality fruit in the home garden. Drs. Dan Cooley and Bill Coli will help participants gain a solid overview of how to identify the key disease, insect, mite, and vertebrate pests that must be controlled to produce a crop of superb fruit. The most effective approaches to pest management, including conventional pesticides, organic techniques, and biological controls, will be discussed in detail.
Tuition = $60 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

April 28
Monitoring and Diagnosing Pest Problems in the Home Orchard UMass Cold Spring Orchard, Belchertown, MA 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM Being able to identify pest problems and monitor pest activity will make you the envy of your neighborhood. You likely will wonder if this ability is a good thing when your neighbors start to bring you all sorts of rotting, diseased, and insect-infested fruits, but it is integral to good pest management. In this hands-on workshop, Drs. Dan Cooley and Bill Coli will show you how to identify pests and use traps and other techniques to monitor their activity. This workshop will be at least partially out of doors, so please dress appropriately for potentially wet, cold, and muddy conditions. Tuition = $40 http://www.massaggieseminars.org/seminars.html

July 11-14
The Second National Conference on Facilitating Sustainable Agriculture Education Held at Cornell University Alice Cook House, located in Ithaca, New York. We are pleased to announce the 2nd National Conference on Facilitating Sustainable Agriculture Education, July 11-14, 2007. Please join us for this exciting opportunity to facilitate a cross-disciplinary dialogue on learning and teaching in sustainable agriculture at colleges and universities in the U.S. The conference will use interactive and participatory formats for workshops and discussions. Scholarship assistance may be available to students. The event will begin on the evening of July 11, include numerous field trips and field exercises in the region, and continue until mid-day on July 14, allowing adequate travel time on both ends. Stay tuned for details in the coming months. In the meantime, please mark your calendars! For more information, please contact Kathi Colen Peck, Conference Coordinator, at kscp@turbonet.com.

Aug 10-12
NOFA Summer Conference at Hampshire College

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Community Board

Request for Workshop Presenters for the 2007 NOFA Summer Conference
Each year, the NOFA Summer Conference provides a valuable opportunity for farmers, gardeners, homesteaders, educators, and environmentalists to share resources and ideas in order to grow a vibrant organic community. We are looking for knowledgeable and enthusiastic presenters to offer workshops in a wide variety of categories, from beginner level to advanced. The categories include: Animals, Crops, Farming and the Community, Farm Economics and Management, Food and Family, Food Safety, Politics and Policy, Fruits and Nuts, Garden and Greenhouse, Herbs and Flowers, International Agriculture, Land Care, Marketing, Nutrition and Healthcare, Of the Spirit, Practical Skills, Research and Education, Soil and Fertility, Technology, Weeds, Insects and Disease, and Farm Tours. Workshop presenters receive free conference registration, a $25 honorarium, and one free meal during the weekend. If you would like to participate, please contact Adrienne Shelton at (413) 625-9503 or adrienne@redgatefarm.org. Potential presenters will be contacted in January 2007.

Volunteer for CT NOFA

  • Event Help Contact Denise D'Agostino for more information at d.dagostino@snet.net
  • Volunteer outreach coordinator Research events that we can display at, Contact them for permission to display, Develop outreach materials Go to events or help schedule other volunteers to go to event. Contact Denise D'Agostino for more information at d.dagostino@snet.net
  • Reporter Goes to CT NOFA events with camera and takes pictures, Gets people’s names that are in pictures and permission to use pictures, Writes stories for Gleanings/ press releases/ website. Contact Denise D'Agostino for more information at d.dagostino@snet.net
  • Distribution Coordinator Annual guide distribution - April through July - coordinates other volunteers statewide. Periodic checking in of distribution points to see if they need more materials. Contact Denise D'Agostino for more information at d.dagostino@snet.net
  • News Watch Reads the newspapers, watches TV and listens to the radio for mention of CT NOFA or its members. Clips articles and records shows and archives them. Formatting to digital files would be ideal for website and permanent saving. This can be done by the same or different volunteer. Contact Denise D'Agostino for more information at d.dagostino@snet.net
  • Join a committee:
    Taste! Organic Connecticut - contact Jim Roby at jroby7088@sbcglobal.net
    Fundraising - contact Janet Heller at janet.heller@snet.net
    Organic Land Care - contact Kim Stoner at kimberly.stoner@po.state.ct.us
    Cultivating an Organic Connecticut Conference - contact Jennifer Brown at jennifer@ctnofa.org

Work for CT NOFA

  • CT NOFA is hiring a bookkeeper. Please send resume to Bill Duesing at CT NOFA, PO Box 164, Stevenson, CT 06491. Job description to follow.
  • CT NOFA is hiring the Gleanings Editor. Please send resume to Bill Duesing at CT NOFA, PO Box 164, Stevenson, CT 06491. Job description to follow.

Established Organic Farm, Farm Stand and CSA business for rent or sale
Six tillable acres, certified organic, Connecticut River frontage, 150 member CSA and farmstand business in Sunderland, MA for rent or sale to experienced CSA farmer. Turnkey, fully-equipped operation. Solar-powered farm stand. Potential for 12 more tillable, transitional acres. Please submit a brief resume and letter of interest by email. info@riverlandfarm.com.

FOR SALE: THE BENSON PLACE - A 38-ACRE HILLTOP WORKING WILD BLUEBERRY FARM
35 MINUTES WEST OF GREENFIELD, MASSACHUSETTS. TOTAL COST: $525,000 OR $400,000 WITH A
COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL PRESERVATION RESTRICTION (BLUEBERRY BUSINESS AN ADDITIONAL $25,000) Direct all inquiries to: DAVE GOTT OR TED WATT, 182 FLAGG HILL ROAD, HEATH, MA 01346 *413-337-5340 * BENPLACE@GIS.NET, http://WWW.GIS.NET/~BENPLACE

Raw Wool Needed
I am seeking raw sheep's wool for use in a new furniture company venture. Can you provide me with contacts in the state of Connecticut that can provide raw wool fiber? Thank you, Muriel Stockdale 212 475-1875 muriela@nyc.rr.com

Dr. Bargyla Rateaver, 1916 - 2006
I am sad to tell you that Dr. Bargyla Rateaver passed away on September 17th, in the early hours of the morning. She appears to have passed peacefully, and without pain. A short biographical sketch of her can be found here: http://home.earthlink.net/~brateaver/ Dr. Rateaver was an internationally recognized expert and advocate on the subject of Organic plant cultivation. Because I know that she was known to your organization and one or more of its members, I wanted to extend this notification to you.

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News and Stories
Open space grants protect farmland!!
Working Lands Alliance (WLA) is grateful to Governor M. Jodi Rell and DEP Commissioner Gina McCarthy for yesterday's announcement of 28 Open Space grants which (by our count) include 8 active farmland parcels and 3 historically farmed properties. WLA also applauds the success by those entities who successfully utilized the Open Space grant program to protect our precious agricultural soils, including: Town of East Haddam, Town of East Windsor, Hamden Land Conservation Trust, City of Middletown, Weantinoge Heritage, Inc., The Salisbury Association, Connecticut Farmland Trust, Southbury Land Trust, Town of Tolland & Trust for Public Land, and the Town of Woodbridge. The November 3 announcement marks the first-time use of proceeds from the Community Investment Act (Public Act 228-05) to be used for the permanent protection of land!! For details about the Open Space grants go to the Governor's press release.

Pennsylvania and New Jersey Stand Against Sweatshops
In late September, the governors of Pennsylvania and New Jersey announced they would join with Gov. John Baldacci of Maine in preventing their state governments from purchasing from businesses that have sweatshop conditions in their supply chains. The announcement makes Pennsylvania and New Jersey the second and third states to take a stand against sweatshops, and Gov. Baldacci wants the coalition to grow even larger. "There's power in numbers," said Baldacci in a statement after the announcement. "We've been doing great work on anti-sweatshop procurement in Maine, but as we team up with other states, we'll have even more influence in the global marketplace."

Baldacci signed the nation's first state-level anti-sweatshop law in 2001, and over the years the state has found it would be easier to monitor supply chains to keep sweatshops out if there were a coalition of states involved, according to Betty Lamoreau, Maine's Division of Purchases director. In February, Baldacci sent letters to the other 49 governors, asking them to join him in making their states sweatshop free. Consider writing to your own governor, asking him or her to follow the example of Pennsylvania and New Jersey, and sign your state onto Baldacci's Governors' Coalition for Sweat-free Procurement. To learn more about how to avoid sweatshops in your own purchases, visit http://www.coopamerica.org/programs/sweatshops/.

A Growing Trend: Small, Local and Organic
Popularity of Farmers Markets, Natural Grocery Stores Helps Cultivate a Rise in Niche Farms By Michael S. Rosenwald Washington Post Staff Writer. This is where Michael Pappas farms: not in the great wide fields of Iowa or in California's industrial salad bowl, but in Lanham. He is eight miles from the Washington Monument, three or four turns from the Beltway, at the end of a long road in a residential neighborhood. He's growing crops on 2 1/2 acres with 2 1/2 employees. Read the whole article at: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2006/11/05/AR2006110500887.html?referrer=emailarticle

Let’s get real, and all commit to using organic seed
Narrow variety focus that makes it impossible to “find” the seed organically is not a way to strengthen the organic seed sector, which is a vital part the future of organics. By Jeff Moyer, The Rodale Institute® Farm Manager Posted November 9, 2006: I’ve just returned from the October NOSB (National Organic Standards Board) meeting in Washington, D.C., fully energized and excited about the future of this industry. From every conceivable corner, organic products are flooding into the marketplace. And every one of them needs what you and I produce—the raw ingredients from farm products, crops and livestock. To read the whole article go to: http://www.newfarm.org/columns/jeff_moyer/2006/1106.shtml

The Vegetable-Industrial Complex
By MICHAEL POLLAN Published: October 15, 2006
Soon after the news broke last month that nearly 200 Americans in 26 states had been sickened by eating packaged spinach contaminated with E. coli, I received a rather coldblooded e-mail message from a friend in the food business. “I have instructed my broker to purchase a million shares of RadSafe,” he wrote, explaining that RadSafe is a leading manufacturer of food-irradiation technology. It turned out my friend was joking, but even so, his reasoning was impeccable. If bagged salad greens are vulnerable to bacterial contamination on such a scale, industry and government would very soon come looking for a technological fix; any day now, calls to irradiate the entire food supply will be on a great many official lips. That’s exactly what happened a few years ago when we learned that E. coli from cattle feces was winding up in American hamburgers. Rather than clean up the kill floor and the feedlot diet, some meat processors simply started nuking the meat — sterilizing the manure, in other words, rather than removing it from our food. Why? Because it’s easier to find a technological fix than to address the root cause of such a problem. This has always been the genius of industrial capitalism — to take its failings and turn them into exciting new business opportunities. Read the whole article at: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/15/magazine/15wwln_lede.html?ex=1164258000&en=7cd014cf4f39cf10&ei=5070

Biotech Rice Puts Harvest At Risk
October 21, 2006 By PAUL ELIAS, Associated Press PRINCETON, Calif. -- Fourth-generation farmer Greg Massa was in the middle of the rice harvest and he was dirty, angry and depressed. The price of the gasoline that powers his water pumps and rice harvester has never been more expensive. A late planting season, a hot summer and rising expenses had ensured a less than stellar harvest, with the U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasting a 13 percent drop, compared with last year.

So the last thing Massa needed was a biotechnology blunder so disastrous that it prompted the rice industry's biggest export customer - Japan - to prohibit some varieties and threaten to ban all U.S. imports. The European Union is making similar threats because genetically engineered rice continues to turn up on grocery shelves in Europe.

"If that happens, the California industry will evaporate," Massa said as he drove the harvester around his farm about 80 miles north of Sacramento. He has spent the past three years publicly protesting the growth of genetically engineered rice anywhere and in any quantity. Biotech-averse overseas consumers in Japan, Europe and elsewhere simply won't buy it, he says, even if the crops are approved for U.S. consumption.

The U.S. rice harvest is imperiled by the discovery of small amounts of experimental strains of genetically engineered rice in storage facilities holding crops destined for the food supply. Bayer CropScience AG, the German company responsible for the mistake, is still investigating how the experimental rice got into the food supply. Federal officials say the company's signature genetically engineered rice came from storage bins in Arkansas and Missouri, but they don't know where it was grown. The rice was genetically engineered by Bayer to be resistant to a weed killer and had never been approved for human consumption. Federal officials and company executives say the strain posed no health threat and was similar to biotech rice that had been approved.

Still, Bayer's blunder has been costly. Rice futures plummeted by $150 million immediately after the contamination announcement, and biotech-hating European retailers pulled U.S. rice from their shelves. Growers in Arkansas, California, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri and Texas filed lawsuits against Bayer for hurting their sales.

Online Analysis of the Bird Flu Pandemic
Dr. Michael Gregor's compelling analysis of the Bird Flu pandemic is now available in its full text online. Gregor, the director of the Public Health and Animal Agriculture sector of the Humane Society of the United States, analyzes how factory farming plays a significant role in the spread of the disease and how the expensive U.S. government policies regarding the potential pandemic are flawed : http://www.BirdFluBook.org

Organic Farmer Jon Tester Elected to United States Senate
Bonn, Germany, November 10th 2006 Jon Tester, an organic farmer and leader in the organic movement since 1987, has been elected as a U.S. Senator from the state of Montana. A third generation farmer from Big Sandy, Montana, he has been farming organically for nearly twenty years.

In 2005, Tester and his wife Sharla were named outstanding agricultural leaders by the College of Agriculture at Montana State University. Their T-Bone Farms is a diversified organic operation with 1400 acres (567 hectares).

The stated goals of their operation are: To produce high quality food; To use environmentally sound farming practices;To improve soil health on their farm; andTo keep the farm in their family. Their crops this year included hard red wheat, hard white wheat, kamut, lentils, and purple barley. Tester is a strong believer in green manures, a type of cover crop grown to be plowed under and incorporated into the soil, adding natural sources of nitrogen and phosphorous, not to mention improving and protecting the soil.

Tester has been a leader in the organic movement for more than a decade. He served as the national treasurer for the Organic Crop Improvement Association International, and helped to develop the Montana Organic Certification program.

Bob Quinn, an organic farmer and President of Kamut International, said "We all started in organic farming nearly 20 years ago in north-central Montana, and since that time Jon Tester has been a great supporter of sustainable and Organic Agriculture - not only on his farm, but also while he was serving at the Montana State Senate. I'm sure he'll be
a strong voice for sustainable and Organic Agriculture in the U.S. Senate as well, as someone who has learned it by experience." He added "We are extremely happy as an organic community" that Tester has been elected to the U.S. Senate. They have been neighbors and friends for 30 years.

According to Thomas B. Harding, former IFOAM President, colleague of Jon Tester and Director of Agrisystems International, "Jon Tester, now U.S. Senator Elect Jon Tester, is an extraordinary man - one who walks his talk, an excellent organic farmer, dedicated to the family farmer, the farm community and to Organic Agriculture in general. He sees the big picture and he will make a very great difference to all of us as he meets his elected responsibilities in the U.S. Senate. How lucky we are to have a man like Jon in our community."

IFOAM Executive Director Angela B. Caudle praised the election of Jon Tester. "IFOAM looks forward to working with Senator Elect Tester to develop and promote Organic Agriculture both in the United States and internationally" she said. "His understanding of soil ecology and the economics of organic production systems will undoubtedly bring a fresh perspective to the U.S. Senate and contribute to the establishment of more sustainable agricultural programs."

DECODING MEAT LABELS FOR THE SENSITIVE CARNIVORE
As animal welfare labeling claims on meat, dairy and eggs continue to proliferate, humane-minded carnivores everywhere are starting to get confused. When a label says "free-range", "grass-fed" or "cage-free", is this really true? Whole Foods Market has recently added a new "animal compassionate" label to meat products in their stores (indicating the animal was treated humanely up until slaughter). The federal government generally does not regulate how farm animals are treated, nor do they verify animal-welfare labels. The government does attempt to require that labels be truthful and has established definitions for common designations like "free range". Yet some third party labeling standards, like Whole Foods new label, are actually more rigorous than the industry norms. Two other highly credible labels to look for include the "free-farmed" label (overseen by the American Humane Association) and the "certified humane" label (administered by Humane Farm Animal Care). Learn more about animal welfare labels here: http://www.organicconsumers.org/2006/article_3207.cfm

THE MEATRIX 2.5!
At the cliffhanger conclusion of The Meatrix II, Moopheus was being dragged off to certain doom at the Happy Farms slaughterhouse. Now, watch Leo and Chickity expose more of factory farming's hidden horrors in their quest to save their friend. Will they reach Moopheus before he is "processed"? Find out at: www.moremeatrix.com.

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